Rate the last film you watched

Discussion in 'The STAGE48 Lobby' started by CDevil, Jul 6, 2007.

  1. hrs0722

    hrs0722 Kenkyuusei

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    Don't open if you haven't watched The Last Jedi, spoiler inside!

    That slave kid may have important role in Episode IX!

    Episode IX is directed by J.J Abrams. After that he'll work for Hollywood adaptation of Your Name. Can you imagine American Your Name?
     
  2. Trinu

    Trinu Upcoming Girls

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    American Your Name can burn.
    Can't wait for it to flop so Hollywood realises there is NO NEED to remake stories that aren't even two years old.

    As for Star Wars...

    I doubt the kid himself will be important at all.
    I think it was more of a way to say "See? The Force isn't anybody's. Anyone can be a Jedi!"

    Since now we know that Rey's parents were nobodies (until IX, that is), it looks like they wanted to show there are other Force-sensitive individuals in the universe that aren't related to the Skywalker clan at all, hence taking away the spotlight from the family.

    The kid might appear in the next film as a padawan of sorts, but I think there will be more.
    Since Rey took the Jedi books (when though?), the story points at her trying to bring back the order.
    Or at least, she's probably going to try and find other potentials and train them to use the Force (for good).
     
  3. AloNeko

    AloNeko Kenkyuusei

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    Why not S.A.S ? Well maybe that not after all him story... Although series composer or that who use piano-pencil -paper for him work for even nowadays!

    Hmmm... What American versions I have seen and liked both? I meet both original and American... Let me in/ Let right in is only for that... Where I looked both and liked both... Only that book I not yet been read...
    Edit": Must say that, hrs0722, that think is seen more cute and ... I think I can allowed it at all..
    What cam. 9 ... What you think? Are it end darkness ( which up Rey possible children's at same as Luke), Lightness ( what possible for one them go to dark) or... Just peace ( and broken after stupid reasons... )
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2017
  4. karles48

    karles48 Kenkyuusei Stage48 Donor

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    Welcome to the WTF Star Wars moment of the day! [hehe]
     
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  5. stormy

    stormy Kenkyuusei

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    An old one... spoilers, in case you're the one person who hasn't seen this:
    • The Hateful Eight -- so you may've realized by now, I don't usually go to cinema in release weeks, due to people who're pathologically unable to shut the fuck up and watch the movie... so catch it weeks later in matinee, or streamed (which of late, has been pretty good for most movies we like at least)... but sometimes they fall off our radar altogether...

      Hate Fellate (well, it *is* a Tarantino movie) wasn't a big priority when Farce Awakens, Jry, The Big Shart, and The Ruminant, were all in the same stack on the marquee two Xmases ago... and tbh, the reviews + another dose of that Guarantino Ultraviolence, wasn't really all that Xmas-y, we thought (even though we both find the commercial lemming-swarm of the holiday, repugnant). Back-burner. Next...

      Two years later... another Store Whores film, The Lost Credi, is in theatres... along with Cor: Rag 'n' a Rock, Just This League... and little else. So back to NF I scroll and click... a lull in the schedule + lunch allowed me to catch Hate Fellate, finally. Nothing else is really pressing (for a site called Netflix... not so many top flicks anymore). Okay, what the hell...

      Imagine you have someone who's seen all the best Westerns ever set to celluloid (John Ford era, IMO), plus a ton of the schlocky but popular ones (all the Wayne & Eastwood Westerns, plus the spaghettis) and now has the chance to make his own homage to them... but also wants to fold in quite bald-faced influences from his own movies (Res Dogs, esp), plus movies with the Ten Little Murder Victims trope he likes (The Thing, esp)... then as a garnish, a last-minute rewrite due to a script leak. This is that movie, exactly... right up until about 3/4 way through, where it suddenly becomes a redemption arc for a racist. W.T.F, over...

      Lots of talking, lots of cleverness, great acting by Walter Goggins. Congrats, Tarantino -- I hated it. 3/10
     
  6. stormy

    stormy Kenkyuusei

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    More NF surfing, 1.5 - 2.5 hrs at a time...
    • OtherLife -- a plot with immediate appeal for me (play of futurist thought set in near-future reality a la Her + nested layers of consciousness a la Inception + good ol' wholesome, part-of-a-nutritious-breakfast cyberpunk a la The Matrix), unfortunately let down by a slightly clunky script, and just as immediate awareness that said script had somehow been pared down too much to final from its literary version (Solitaire by Kelley Eskridge)... in the end it just makes you feel like you've watched a Netflix original, imagine that... not quite movie-level scale, but ill-fitting a TV script. And that's the impression that seems to stick the strongest.

      A surprisingly visceral performance from Jessica De Gouw as Ren Amari... I'd not watched Arrow or Underground, so had no prior impressions upon which to taint the work... while she wasn't Meryl Streep, she also was nowhere near say, Gina Carano or Michelle Rodriguez or Ronda Rousey... all of which I reckon make a *lot* more than Jessica per gig. Her performance was measured, soulful, complex... and most importantly, restricted by a script with enough corners cut from it to qualify as spherical. Every character except for Ren was pretty much 8-bit in resolution...

      That said it's balanced somewhat by the gorgeous location settings (what little we see of them is a crime) and the competent cinematography that desaturates and plays with the harsh Perth light as in Inception... and astonishingly, as in the US (Gore Verbinski) version of The Ring, esp the water montages... which is one of my favorite movies to show as an example of how to tell a story/create and sustain a sense of deep dread/amplify the spookiness of Seattle, with almost no dialogue.

      But man -- what a story. And what a movie it would've made, in Chris Nolan's hands, with a Chris Nolan budget. 6/10
     
  7. hrs0722

    hrs0722 Kenkyuusei

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    Nagasawa Marina said that her dream is to appear on Star Wars movie. OK. I'm gonna support her. If it's true that new Star Wars Trilogy is based on KOTOR, I hope she'll play Bastila Shan, the main heroine.

    But the problem is that if she gains international attention as she's appearing on Star Wars, people would google her and found her photos in bikini or even nude. Is it good or bad for her?

    Note: I dunno if she has acting career.
     
  8. Trinu

    Trinu Upcoming Girls

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    Get Out.

    I haven't been so satisfied with an ending like this since Death Proof.
     
  9. JoltFiend

    JoltFiend Kenkyuusei Stage48 Donor

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    Along with a cold, I caught I, Tonya and The Shape of Water over my holiday break from work. I thought both were very good movies.
     
  10. Doflamingo

    Doflamingo Kenkyuusei

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    IT (2017)
    i never seen the old one but this version looks good..after knew that clown wasn't a ghost i'm not scared anymore
     
  11. stormy

    stormy Kenkyuusei

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    Zodiac (2007) -- don't want my wife to have to get up and clean the house after dropping our houseguests off at the airport ( :1st: )... so this'll be short and sweet: I was bored out of my friggin' mind by this movie... but since it was praised by many a source I respect, watched to the credits. Bad idea (IMO)...

    If you're already a fan of the Zodiac serial killings' timeline and characters, this movie'll be entertaining... but man did it waste some formidable acting talent. Pre-Iron-Man Robert Downey Jr as Paul Avery, giving us a taste of basically himself... something Marvel'd use to illustrate Tony Stark (another RDJr catharsis role) a year later. Jake Gyllenhaal as Robert Graysmith, author of the eponymous book about the killings which featured his role leading in this movie. I neither diss Jake's work nor laud it... liked Donnie Darko and Source Code, even though the latter's premise needles my plot-hole troll. But I felt his character in this movie was deeply irritating, even if intentional. Haven't seen Nightcrawler yet (hmm... Iron Man and Nightcrawler in the same movie lol), since its one of his most lauded roles, think seeing it would be polite before passing judgement on this one; I'll add that unknown into my numerical rating.

    Plod... irritate... plod... irritate. Chloë Sevigny's Melanie seemed another wasted opportunity. Brian Cox? Nope. Dermot Mulroney? Nada. Adam Goldberg? You get it. Near the end, the credits were a welcome sight, as the climax/denouement was as unfulfilling as riding a rollercoaster based on Florida's topography. Saving grace: Mark Ruffalo's Dave Toschi. At least he wasn't wasted in this half-baked, underdone Good Grief Wellington of a movie. 5/10
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2018
  12. marioworldakb

    marioworldakb Upcoming Girls Stage48 Donor

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    Star Wars Episode 8 1.5/5

    Sorry I tried...but really not a big fan of this route they are dragging with. >__>

    And people said that Jar Jar Binks was an annoying character but I find that the CG bird creature even 100 times more annoying looool

    After watching the movie with my friends, I literally didn't comment a word and went straight back home to watch some STU shows and laugh away all the disappointments from the movie.
     
  13. stormy

    stormy Kenkyuusei

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    Infinity Chamber (2017) -- I must admit right off the bat... once I'd heard the premise of this movie, I was going to commit to watching it...

    The scifi thriller is my favorite movie genre. Add a puzzle and psychological elements, and I'm there. Obviously this isn't a genre known for reliable box-office home runs -- the granddaddy of them all, '2001: A Space Odyssey', and its equally-influential offspring 'Blade Runner', were both flops -- but both also found their audiences long after leaving the cinema, to become two of the most influential movies ever made.

    'Infinity Chamber' has a premise which closely mirrors that of another indie film I've rated recently, 'OtherLife' -- an escape the room trope.

    I feel room-escape puzzles (a la the old Flash/Shockwave web games) tap into something deep and primal, yet also disorient in the way they don't rush you forward with threats, like a side-scroller or FPS game... you can literally sit motionless and do nothing in most of them -- and nothing happens. That adds to the sense of isolation and helplessness, even if you're allowed to do exactly what you want to do -- nothing. Now add puzzles with often eerie and unsettling implications and inability to decipher them... and I often have had to scramble for the walkthrough after hours with the hard ones, like surfacing for air.

    This movie has that sort of effect on you. Pundits at the L.A. Times and others call it 'lost potential' and 'way too long'... but I didn't feel anything like that as I watched Frank Lerner try to figure out why he's imprisoned. It felt very organic, if a bit hard to follow at times... but then it feels like you're going through the same disorientation as in Frank's dilemma. The ending wraps up the loose ends nicely, while leaving two fundamental questions unanswered. Like the best scifi movies, there are a lot of '-explained' articles written about what happens.

    What I was most intrigued about in the plot however, is the systematic, software-efficient gaslighting of a prisoner, and the blurring of lines separating the real-time experience of reality, from sanitized, 1000K-rendered memorized past experience... then what someone would do, if those memories were to become altered transparently, without your knowledge. How could someone figure out, how to trap you in your own mind? Brilliantly-done, if a bit long. 9/10
     
  14. stormy

    stormy Kenkyuusei

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    Full Metal Jacket (1987) -- I've seen this movie enough times to quote minutes of its dialogue -- I am ex-military, after all, and this is a mythically-relevant film to those whom service to country has been fulfilled (at least in the Army and Marine Corps, ground pounders)... but those are only really certain parts, in a certain context. It's on NF, so decided to watch it end-to-end again, and see if the long time elapsed since last end-to-end viewing (probably 2003 or so) changed anything about its impact, or how it makes me feel.

    There's no way to predict how a film you know the beats to by heart, will change upon actual, paid-attention viewing, years later. It happened with several films I cherish as favorites -- Blade Runner (the latest DCs of which only made me appreciate the original film more, vs. the strange and frustratingly-embellished 2017 version); The Terminator & T2: Judgement Day; 2001: A Space Odyssey; Saving Private Ryan, Inception, and a handful more. You just notice different things, use the experience of the intervening years transparently to create new feelings about different aspects of the film you never noticed before.

    FMJ's heart and soul to me will always be its boot camp sequence -- when I went through myself at Fort Jackson, SC a million years ago, this is the one bit of 'the world' we were able to get treated to. Eight weeks of almost total isolation, breaking-down, and rebuilding by the numbers... watching a movie all of us knew about and could relate to, was like winning the lottery for us tired, sore, but motivated bastards. There was a great number of us -- me included -- who'd only shot maybe .22LR or had a buddy whose father was ex-mil, and gave us a try on an old .357 Python or vintage M1 carbine... contrasted against the boys from the sticks who'd had firearms training since childhood (mostly from the South -- some things never change). So us noobs definitely had our work cut out for us trying to live up the standard these HS track stars set for us in the eyes of the drill instructors. That's made abundantly clear with FMJ's brilliant R. Lee Ermey, who was an actual Corps drill instructor hired late for the film -- and saved it, IMO.

    For you Millennials who've never served -- never taken apart a firearm, cleaned it and oiled it, then assembled it into a working weapon again; never had someone an inch from your face shouting at you top of their lungs, spittle hitting your face, to climb a rickety wooden tower made of telephone poles 60 ft straight up hand-over-hand, then slide down a single rope back down; march 20 miles over endless hills with a 60 lb rucksack in 100 degF-90% humidity weather; crawl through 8" of sawdust 100 yds with half-sticks of dynamite going off next to you and bullets whizzing 18" above your ass... until you actually did it, then thrived anyway despite it... this kind of movie may be anathema to your life. You have the right -- and may not've had a choice. But whatever you do -- please do not disparage those who've served, or try to downplay their experiences, knowledge, values, or related present physical/mental hardships, of service to flag and country. If you don't want to know what it's like firsthand or don't agree with the way we express our values, fine -- we served so you have the right to do such things. But don't assume we're beneath you, within reason of course. That said, there are no shortage of vets that'll respond to such provocation unreasonably, immediately, and in no uncertain terms. So please, show active-duty and vets some respect, whatever your politics may be. I will do the same for yours... within reason. :flower:

    Where I tend to see differences over time, are in the actual combat sequences. This time I heard the dialogue not as a 15-yr-younger adult, but as Now Me. And there are lines that totally went over my head (or just were assumed to be one thing and brushed aside) 15 years ago, and those that gored into my chest with meaning back then, but mean something different now.

    "So waitaminit stormy -- yeah okay you're a vet, yeah you like this movie... but how do I grasp what you're talking about, when I don't have anything close to the timeline you lived through? How do you convey an ex-military perspective to those whom military service is alien at best?"

    The best I can do is use general & non-military-specific terms, which I promise to do. However, since this movie predominantly has fans in the para- and ex-/active-military community... if I can't convey exactly how it's changed clearly enough, I do sincerely apologize.

    I've recently watched the Stanley Kubrick documentary 'S is for Stanley', by and of his personal assistant of 30+ years, Emilio D'Alessandro. Also seen both Kubrick and FMJ documentaries on DVD in their entirety. So details about the film and how it was made, aren't what hit me right out of the gate. It's how much the pejoratives used in the movie, really bother me now. Really. It's a measure of how much the American sociopolitical landscape's changed over 15 yrs (as well as my own). None of these things actually bothered me then... now, the bald-faced gauche of such words and phrases spoken out loud, are jarring and disruptive... like smelling cigarette smoke when you've recently had half a lung removed.

    I was also much more repulsed by the characterization of the Vietnamese (however accurate they may've once been). I do parse that against the fact that it was wartime (which in reality brings out the worst in people far more than the best, sadly), and Kubrick did want this to be a dark, gritty, non-happy-ending sort of movie. I suppose this is a sign my present self knows a fair bit more of bright, hopeful, affirmative touchpoints in life, to contrast and afford such feelings -- which is something to take to heart. I've also met many Vietnamese friends in my time, all of whom to a man/woman want to keep the present the present, and not pick at the scars of the past. Ironically... the generation that would've fought -- and escaped -- the draft in the Vietnam era... are now running the country. So in a way, some of the repugnant aspects of this movie to Now Me, are more relevant than ever... as apparently the party currently in power want to make such pejoratives, characterizations, and themes the standard again, reversing all the progress we've made. And in a single phrase, I answer Fuck That... and it warms my heart. I hope that's not too military a term. :p

    Lastly there are some details 15-yrs-ago-Me, wanting to skip to the good parts... didn't really see the gravity of until now. I see parallels between the gaslighting so popular with 45, and the crap political (in a superior/subordinate context) games that some of the dialogue so clearly makes. Since I'm so familiar with the infantile games of the alt-right these days (funny coming from an ex-mil gun enthusiast and former roadracer, I suppose... but also a minority, LGBT one :^^;:) that when I hear them in the movie, they stick up like bright purple thumbs.

    So, a rating. These new insights not only helped contextualize the film in the era it was made... but also helped me realize how much I've changed (didn't think I had... but you're always a poor judge of how much you change; others can sense delta much better). It also made the film a bit more profound, & made me realize how timeless this film is. 8/10
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2018
  15. karles48

    karles48 Kenkyuusei Stage48 Donor

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    Jumanji: welcome to the jungle. I was one of those hardcore fans that were more than skeptical about this sequel but, against all odds, I enjoyed it. It isn't perfect, of course, but it's still far more 'fresh' than I expected. 8/10
     
  16. Cristafari

    Cristafari Stage48 Admin Staff Member Stage48 Admin

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    Last month I watched a bunch of films on the plane going to California. The three that stood out to me....

    Your Name (Kimi no Na Wa)

    With all the hype, I really wanted to see what this this was all about. IN a nutshell, two high school students, one a boy and the other a girl, seem to switch bodies on alternate days when they fall asleep. First of all, I loved the realism of the animation. I thought it was a beautifully animated film, and I love the twist in the story where you realize what's really going on. I found myself emotionally invested in the characters, and their ultimate fate. I like it so much that I re-watched it on the flight back to Tokyo. 9/10


    Gintama

    I loved the idea of seeing Ogori Shun playing a goofy character based on an anime. This film actually has a lot of familiar faces, Suda Masaki, Yasuda Ken, Okada Masaki, Nasagawa Masami, Arai Hirofumi, Domoto Tsuyoshi, (from KinKi Kids) even Hayami Akari (Momoclo Blue) But what really got me excited was Hashimoto Kanna, who I am a huge fan of, and have even met an a couple of occasions. (I have met Hayami Akari as well when she was in Momoclo) For the most part, I enjoyed the film. I thought it was somewhat overlong for the type of film it was (140 minutes) and I thought the end dragged on a bit. I probably would have enjoyed it more if I was more familiar with the source material. On the other hand, I thought that this was a tour de force performance for Kanna. Her character was dopey, yet clever. She was sloppy, but cute. Most of all, she was soooo funny. The scene where she is making fun of her rival for having "dirty panties" was hysterical. They even pay homage to the whole "Once in 10,000 year idol" bit. If you are a fan of any of these actors, (and I am) it is worth the watch. Not the greatest film, but fun enough. 7/10



    In This Corner of the World (Kono Sekai no Katasumi ni)

    I was wondering what Nounen Rena was up to since Amachan. I didn't even know she changed her professional name to "Non." This anime is a semi-historical drama that takes place in Hiroshima leading up to the dropping of the atomic bomb, and its aftermath. It's about a young girl named Suzu, and how she adapts to help her family survive during wartime Japan. It was slow at times (I dozed off at one point) but very interesting. And surprisingly it had a few graphic scenes. (The horrors of war and famine) Much different from Your Name, but I appreciate that in Japan animated films touch on serious subjects like this, and are not necessarily "Children's Movies." In any case, I enjoyed listening to Nounen Rena perform. 7/10

     
  17. karles48

    karles48 Kenkyuusei Stage48 Donor

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    Star wars: the last Jedi It was about time! ;) 9/10
    I really enjoyed this one. There are still things I didn't like (a pilot alone destroying all the turrets of a dreadnought (really?), Leia surviving in space, Kylo Ren deceiving his master that easily, the number of rebels that first filled the trenches but in the end were so few that they fit in the Falcon...) but I felt the energy of the old movies for the first time in a long time...
     
  18. karles48

    karles48 Kenkyuusei Stage48 Donor

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    New police story. I'm used to Jackie's comedies, so this film was a little shock. It's a bit macabre, but I liked it. 8.5/10
     
  19. stormy

    stormy Kenkyuusei

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    Dunkirk -- I'm an unabashed fan of Chris Nolan's films since Memento -- his study of temporal non-linearity and spare use of embellishment for its own sake (the anti-Bay/Snyder), lend his films an unmistakeable feel that's both new and cutting-edge, yet rooted deeply in traditional, classic techniques. If I were to compare him to his counterpart in electronic music, it'd be Squarepusher (Tom Jenkinson, not surprisingly another boundary-stretching artist from England). A devoted student of classical technique, used in laterally-thought, untrod soil...

    My first viewing of this movie was so outside expectations (even for Nolan), that it felt irritatingly terse. Being aware this is probably due to some shortcoming of my own (and that Nolan doesn't insult his audience's intelligence by dumbing down the material if at all possible)... I watched it a second time. This is when a lot of the pieces began to fill out and match others' lobes and notches, properly...

    The use of time overlap and flashback was (at least to me) too steep a device to use so early in the film, as war movies I've come to hold as the gold standard for Second World War stories (Saving Private Ryan, at tippy-top), use a much more linear & solemn but beginning-to-end tone, peppered with the panic and violence of combat -- much like war itself. However, the second time I could appreciate another aspect of combat, under-appreciated by those who dramatize it for the screen -- how the tension of war and the individual experiences of those facing death, removes any sense of time's linearity -- your memories become a collection of moments, packaged in horror, fear, anguish, desolation -- time ceases to exist. That's what this film expertly fit together with micron precision... those who live through the brutal triages of combat, bring back emotions, made tellable by contexts... not the other way round.

    Other than some rather unrealistic decisions made by some of the characters (I appreciate Nolan's sparse use of blood and gore, even if WWII was full of it... but can we fire our guns when the enemy is in the crosshairs, please?), and lack of character development, probably due to prioritizing the short run-time... this was a very nice story of human decency and bravery under impossible circumstances, told in a new way, to address an ancient truth of combat. His decisions to use more physical props rather than CG, is also a great plus in my book (a la Tom Jenkinson's bass in his music). 9/10
     
  20. stormy

    stormy Kenkyuusei

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    The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring -- Seventeen years. It's been 17 years since this movie's name was on cinema marquees everywhere in the States, disappearing over me as I went to see it with mates (as well as my future mate). Meaning this movie is older than quite a few posters here, reading this review. Time flies...

    What does TFOTR feel like, watching it on streaming technology impossible by standards of its time, its two other trilogy-mate films taking the Oscars by storm, setting new standards for fantasy film profitability, props and sfx quality, tasteful use of CG, and efficiently filming a whole trilogy at once and debuting them all a year apart? Both behind the camera and on-screen, this trilogy set the pace and moved the bar up, in some cases irreversibly, for others to top with even more high-quality genius...

    That said... watching this in the highest resolution possible, I did see some artifacts of an era without the kind of camera tech we enjoy today (RED Epic, Arri Alexa, Sony CineAlta), but I'll chalk this up to watching a seemingly endless barrage of Marvel movies, filmed at higher and higher resolutions, for the past ten years. Also, having seen the excellent DVD sets and their exhaustive and surgical decomposition of every scene and prop, makes watching the movie almost anti-climactic -- an experience I can liken to, was my awe and reverence for sportbikes and riding them with skill... until I became a mechanic and racer. When you name a demon, it loses its power -- similarly, when I learn all of the not-necessarily-awesome things that make up every awesome thing... it loses that mystique with every step of progress into competence. Not that you can't love an awesome thing like wrenching or racing... but the mystery in it that may sustain your enthusiasm, will in no uncertain fashion, go away. Never meet your heroes? Exactly...

    TFOTR was like that, having not watched this sprawling, near-4-hr movie end-to-end since the last edition of the DVD set debuted (2006?). As the least favorite of three films, it already had a knock on its pate... but does have one of my favorite scenes in the trilogy: the introduction of Liv Tyler's Arwen, when Liv Tyler was at her most spectacular... recalling her devotion to Aragorn in the garden at Rivendell. The accompanying music, Enya's 'Aníron', is perfect for the scene in a way few movies have managed before or since. But the rest of the movie has a strange issue with pacing I can't put my finger on... it's as if either I'm actually beginning to get used to the ADHD-like pacing in modern movies... or more likely, the editors of this movie simply wanted to showcase so much stuff they'd slaved long months to achieve with so much groundbreaking sfx and prop work -- understandable, but palpable. This pacing issue improves despite the similar runtimes of the other two movies, so think it may just be a first-run thing on such a gargantuan project.

    In all, 17 years... after breaking the mold in so many areas, dissecting itself and embedding into the minds of moviegoers so deeply, it approaches parody in pop culture, a la the Harry Potter effect the leads in that franchise know well. I almost felt a pre-emptive fatigue, just seeing this movie finally (finally!) making it onto the slab at Netflix... what, with their Amazon-like throw-money-at-it strategy, NF-funded projects are now not quite living up to quality standards -- oops! -- wasn't surprised this site is only posting up D-movies nowadays. But back to TFOTR... while some of those feelings of enthusiasm and wonder were dredged back up from under layers of subsequent experience... it was a somewhat bittersweet reunion (which, full disclosure... is a flavor I tend to prefer -- or have just gotten used to -- at my age). Still can't wait for LOTR: TTT on NF, to pick up that shard of enthusiasm and run with it... if they ever stop making crap homebrew. 6/10
     

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